5 truths of the female American football player  

Stallions shut out Dread-‘noughts’ to win 2017 Sapphire Series

American football is a fairly niche sport in this country. Despite that, it’s growing – especially in the female game. As a current player for the Wembley Stallions, it has quickly become my life. In my opinion, it’s the best sport you can play, but with it being relatively unknown the thought of joining a team can be intimidating. However, if you are considering it, here are some truths about the sport from a female perspective.

  1. No one looks good in spandex

There’s a phrase in football – Look good, play good. Whilst I appreciate the sentiment, I can’t help but question its truth. Sure, there’s the aesthetic pride you feel when an action shot makes its way on to Facebook, but in reality football is not an attractive sport. If helmets and shoulder pads weren’t bad enough, the creators of this wonderful activity decided to team it with stretchy, and often shiny, spandex leggings. In case you still feel a sense of body confidence after squeezing in to the dreaded pants, you’re then required to stuff blocks of polystyrene over your thighs and hips until you’re so bulky you feel worse than you do after powering through a whole tin of Quality Street on Christmas Day.

Despite that, this complete lack of importance for appearance is what’s refreshing about the sport. There’s never an expectation for you to look a certain way. No one cares if you wear a full face of make-up; no one cares if you don’t. You can walk around freely in sweats all day and there’s no Netflix in sight. The only thing you need to do is turn up and give your all.

  1. The first five minutes of training are the worst. The remaining hours are the best

After working all week, the idea of waking up early on a Saturday to run around a field isn’t very appealing. As a team, no one is happy when we’re kitting up and we often discuss why we’re so stupid to get up and do this.

However, after a few minutes those feelings begin to fade away. You look around and realise that you’re playing a sport that is truly awesome and that so few people in the U.K. get to experience. It takes a lot of effort to play and you have to be committed, but it rewards you like you wouldn’t believe. Be it fitness, friendship or competition, this is a sport that has it all. Whilst finding the effort to go to training may be difficult, it’s always worth it in the end.

  1. Losing is painful but the winning makes up for it 

No one likes to lose. It goes against our very nature of survival to come in second place. A loss is worse in American Football. When you have spent the last hour pushing your body to the limit and quite literally throwing yourself in the way of defeat, it hurts more than ever when the result doesn’t go your way.

While the hurt of a loss aches, it makes the winning that much better. This season, the Wembley Stallions women’s team won our first divisional title. It made up for all the early mornings spent practicing. It made up for the bruises and exhaustion. While you may have to harbour the pain of a loss from time to time, there is no reward greater than winning in this game. It’s one of the reasons you’ll keep coming back for more.

  1. You’ll have more WhatsApp groups than actual team mates 

Offence, defence, coaches, captains… these are a few of the WhatsApp groups I’ve had over my time playing football. As a footballer, you’ll need to brace yourself for the ongoing notifications for the foreseeable future. While that may not seem too much of a plus, it’s quite nice knowing there’s always someone on the end of the phone. There’s always an answer to your question should you have one. There’s always someone up at 1am when you can’t sleep to help go through the playbook with you. It’s a support system as much as it is a team.

It also reflects the diversity that comes with this sport. You are not limited to one position. You can choose to play offence or defence or both. If you feel like your size and strength are your main weapons there’s a position for that. If you feel that your speed and agility are your go-to skills, there’s a position for that. If you think you have nothing to offer, this sport guarantees that you do. It encompasses the best that everyone has to offer and while tens of WhatsApp groups might not sound appealing, at least you’ll know there is most definitely a place for you.

  1. A group of strangers will become your family 

Joining a new team can be nerve wracking, but after the nerves from the first few sessions have gone, you’ll start to realise just how much your team mates begin to mean to you. Sport brings people together. You understand what each other is going through, be it good or bad. You realise that despite the occasional tiredness or stresses that come with playing competitive sport, you get to spend a day of the week with some of your favourite people.

Being on a team means you always have each other’s back, even when things are their rockiest. In American football, that is something that you are guaranteed to have. People always say you find your best friends in school, but I’ve found more than that. I’ve found a group of women I consider to be my family. You can’t pick your family and you can’t pick your team mates, but somehow you always end up loving them just the same. This will always be the greatest reason to play this sport.

The Wembley Stallions Women’s team is holding an open taster session on Saturday 15th July from 10am – 12pm. If you are interested, please contact teammanager@wembleystallions.com.

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Stallions shut out Dread-‘noughts’ to win 2017 Sapphire Series

Stallions shut out Dread-‘noughts’ to win 2017 Sapphire Series

The Wembley Stallions women’s team have won the 2017 Sapphire Series Division II South and East title after shutting out Portsmouth Dreadnoughts in a title deciding clash.

Scores of 52-12 against Oxford Saints and 24-0 against Portsmouth Dreadnoughts earned The Stallions the divisional series on home soil, with Women’s Head Coach Andrew Kendall stating “13 individuals performed as a team.”

Four first half touchdowns and a stout defensive performance shocked the Dreadnoughts who came into the weekend seeing themselves as favourites for the title.

The first round of fixtures on the day saw Wembley play off against Oxford Saints. It didn’t start as planned with Oxford taking an early lead, however Wembley were quick to respond, with Angie Sowerby running the ball into the end zone, the conversion complete to Grace Hilbourne.

Head coach Andrew Kendall opened the trick play draw with a flea flicker, QB Emma Arnold and RB Chloe Flowers link up to extend the lead. The defence were also making big plays, forcing a fumble in the Oxford half, however the offence couldn’t capitalise.

Oxford made things interesting by running the ball for 6 once again, and drops in the end zone just before half time saw the score at 14-12 to the Stallions going into the break.

The start of the second half saw some dramatic action. Wembley started with the ball. A throw from Emma Arnold was intercepted by the Oxford defence, but showing true character, Wembley forced another fumble, recovering the ball and giving themselves 4 more downs to move the ball.

The drive was capped off when Emma Arnold connected with Tamarra Croucher, with the conversion once again finding Grace Hilbourne.

Oxford tried to get back into the game, but Wembley’s defence held out strong on their own 2-yard line. After coming back out on offence, Angie Sowerby ran in another touchdown. Further touchdowns from Chloe Flowers and Grace Hilbourne gave Wembley a 44-12 lead.

The game was topped off with a pick 6 for Lina Malten, the resulting completed conversion gave Wembley a 52-12 victory.

With Portsmouth beating Peterborough in the first round of the days’ fixtures, the game between Wembley and Portsmouth would decide who came out on top in the division.

The two best defences in the division proved so, with both teams being held to a 4 and out.

Portsmouth who originally looked to run the ball tried to move the ball with the pass but failed to do so. After a turn of possession, Emma Arnold linked up with Grace Hilbourne once again for a 30-yard touchdown.

Portsmouth gained their first, first down in response, however failed to pass the ball into the end zone.

Wembley came out once again and eventually saw Angie Sowerby find her way to the house once again, the conversion attempt was unsuccessful once again as Wembley led 12-0.

A false start on the first play of Portsmouth next drive pushed them 17 yards away from a first down. The Wembley D piled on the pressure forcing a fumble and recovering on the Portsmouth 3-yard line.

The chance was capitalised on with Chloe Flowers receiving the ball in the end zone. Portsmouth tried to respond once again, however failed to get past a resilient defence.

The play of the game came with 23 seconds left for #23. A wonderfully executed one handed catch from Grace Hilbourne gave QB Emma Arnold her 4th touchdown pass, and Wembley a 3-score lead going into the half.

Soon after the second half began Wembley had the ball in the end zone once again through Angie Sowerby, however a holding foul called the play back. Portsmouth forced a fumble and took over possession diving on top of the ball on the Wembley 8-yard line.

Wembley remained firm once again and stopped Portsmouth from mounting a comeback. Another possession from each team saw both teams defence hold out strong, with Delta Npuna piling the pressure on the Portsmouth quarterback, and Demi Adesanya denying the run game.

Another Wembley touchdown was called back for a holding foul, and with 5:40 left Portsmouth looked to get back into the game. Ny Clarke-Williamson stepped up late on with a big hit to stop which could have become a scoring play, as well as pulling off an interception to deny Portsmouth any points in the game. As well as earning the Stallions the divisional title.

After the game Women’s Head Coach Andrew Kendall emphasised the steep learning curve which the team has gone through, throughout the season. Stating “It is better as a coach to be around players who want to learn and want to win.”

Wembley Stallions Head Coach and Chairman Warren Smart applauded the amazing achievement from the women’s team, and ahead of the senior teams season said that it should motivate all teams around the club to perform to the standard the women have set.

Next up for the Wembley Stallions Women’s team will be an exhibition game against London Warriors who could arguably be regarded as the biggest women’s team in London. Coach Kendall noted that it will be a step up in class for his team, but after the days’ performances, they will be ready.

Wembley Stallions Women go 3-1 in Sapphire Series

Wembley Stallions Women go 3-1 in Sapphire Series

Two wins in the Sapphire series last Saturday saw the Wembley Stallions women go 3-1, putting them behind the Dreadnoughts on point difference.

Wins against Portsmouth Dreadnoughts 23-22, and Oxford Saints 60-25, pushed the Stallions to 3-1 in the women’s Sapphire series after a fine display on offence and defence.

The Stallions started the day against the team heading into the day in the top position, the Portsmouth Dreadnoughts who were sat on 2-0.

The game asked the question to which team had the better defence. The Stallions looked to answer that question early with a pair of safeties, with Delta Npuna and Tikka Taylor key to denying the Dreadnoughts moving the ball downfield.

The offence also started strongly, with Lina Malden catching the first TD of the game. However, the Dreadnoughts kept in the game, responding with a pick 6. Chloe Flowers got the second TD of the game, making the game 16-12 at the half.

Wembley Stallions Women go 3-1 in Sapphire Series

As the second half started it was clear that the Dreadnoughts had upped the temp, starting strong. The Stallions extended their lead through rookie Tamara Croucher, with Grace Hilbourne converting on the PAT, in what would be a pivotal play.

The Stallions defence fought with aggression to hold on for the win which moved them to 2-1, and handing the Dreadnoughts the first loss of the series.

Next up for the Stallions was Oxford Saints who after beating Peterborough Royals earlier on, were also sat on a 2-1 record.

The Saints tried to run the ball early in the game but to no avail, with Demi Adesanya making key stops to deny the run game.

Wembley Stallions Women go 3-1 in Sapphire Series

Grace Hilbourne got the first TD of the game, and her second of the day. The conversion attempt was intercepted by the Saints however who looked to take the ball to the Stallions end zone. What occurred after was something you usually only see in the movies.

The Stallions reacted quickly to the interception, forcing the Saints to fumble the ball, the Stallions recovered the ball and looked to take the ball back to the intentional destination of the Saints end zone. The ball was however fumbled once more, the Saints recovered the ball, and took eventually got the ball over the line.

This sparked the Stallions into life. An injured Angie Sowerby, who cracked her ankle in the game against the Dreadnoughts took the ball 35 yards to the house, outpacing everyone to put the Stallions back into the driving seat.

Another touchdown by Chloe Flowers followed shortly afterwards, while the Stallions defence allowed little, with Anna Young making a crucial tackle to deny the Saints moving the ball.

Ny Clarke-Williamson made what could be called the play of the day, diving low to make an ankle height catch to earn the Stallions another TD.

Wembley Stallions Women go 3-1 in Sapphire Series

Wembley Stallions recruit volunteers from UCFB Wembley

Written by Ben Clubley

The Wembley Stallions have recruited several students from UCFB Wembley to help out with the running of the club.

The students will help with the organising of all events and match days, working on the camera’s, as well as more behind the scenes operations such as marketing, finance and social media aspects.

Volunteer Samantha Read said that working for the Stallions allows her to learn practically, and put theory into action. “I can also use my past experience and apply them to the job role.”

Students were interacted with at the universities freshers fair, which not only looked for students to help with the running of the club but also playing for the club.

Several students attended the trial day with a selection of them helping out with the running and filming of the event, and many also taking part.

Kerry Fothergill who is also a volunteer for the Stallions says that working with the club gains her real experience and she wants to be part of the team and help them develop.

With the Wembley Stallions looking to push fan experience at games and make the game more of a spectacle sport, the link up with students from UCFB Wembley is highly beneficial for both parties.

The club gain extra help in the running of events and bring in fresh new ideas as well as expanding the size of the family, while the students gain working experience from their time.

Wembley Stallions’ plans for the future

Written by Ben Clubley

The future looks bright for Wembley Stallions, with head coach and chairman Warren Smart looking to win the top division within the next few years and bring a large crowd to games.

The main target for head coach Warren Smart is to be the best, having both male and female players from the Stallions representing Great Britain across Europe, and to go on to win the Southern Premier Division within the next few years.

There is also the hope of bringing in large crowds in the hundreds for home games. American football is growing fast in England and especially around Wembley. Over 80,000 people turn out for the NFL International series games every year, a fraction of that will be greatly beneficial for the Stallions.

Head coach and chairman Warren Smart states how he remembers when he started playing American football back in the 1980’s and how they would play using bicycle helmets instead of the proper equipment.

Equipment however is easier to come across in Britain now with the Stallions having enough pads and helmets for the team, and necessary training equipment. The club also boast a full 100-yard field which is rare in the country.

In the near future Coach Smart would like to have the club purchase a scoreboard so that the supporters can clearly see the score line adding to their experience.

Further down the road there are hopes of improving the facilities on site, bringing in portable toilets, and maybe even adding portable stands to give the fans a better view of the game.

Another idea which Coach Smart talked about was of having special themed games like they do in America. College and high school football in The States is filled with themed games such as homecoming and senior games. Doing so could help increase the interest in the game within the local area and improve match day attendances.

One of the rising tools online is that of YouTube and Facebook live streaming. With Wembley Stallions already owning a camera tower there’s the potential of using the equipment to live stream games online for followers to watch. This could also help increase the clubs fanbase.

With all these ideas circulating around the Stallions camp, and American football on the rise in the country, the future of the side looks strong. The plans will improve the fan experience at home games, which may entice more people to come down and watch the games. All this will make the sport more of a spectacle, challenging that of other sports.

Trial and Combine Day

Written by Ben Clubley

Preparation for the 2017 season kicked off on the 26th November as the annual Wembley Stallions try-outs and combine day took place.

The new season may not start till April, and pre-season may still be 2 months away, however the Stallions have already begun their preparation for the 2017 season with the hosting of the try-out and combine day.

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Over 106 faces showed up early for the try-outs, with participants spending 15 minutes at each of the 7 stations, each station dedicated to a different position amongst the team.

The day put players new and old from ages as young as 13 to the test, with over 3 hours of drills and testing taking place on what was a very cold but clear day.

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Pulo, one of the young new-coming participants trying out for the under 19’s team, stated that the experience was “really good” and that they “got to try everything on the day.”

Try-outs were held for all 5 teams, from the under 14’s, all the way up to the senior and women’s sides. The new female players joined in with the fully paced women’s practice session ahead of their trip to Sheffield for their final tournament in the Opal Series.

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One of the spectacles of the day was the hard hitting, 2v2 Oklahoma drill which was put on show by the returning players. Showing the new-comers to the team what they were getting themselves into.

After a short break the players were on to the second half of their day and the NFL styled combine. Individuals were put to the test physically, with drills focusing on speed, strength and flexibility.

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The day was ended with players taking part in what seemed a gruelling 1 mile run around the field.

The next time the players will be back playing will be January 21st when the first day of pre-season commences.

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The Stallions – A Team Managers Perspective

My introduction to American football was about 20 years ago, yes I know you didn’t realise it had been around so long! Channel 4 started showing NFL at about the same time and Dan Marino was playing for the Dolphins, I loved the colours and the razzmatazz that came along with the game, and of course the Crunch of play. I starting to help out at a local team the Stanmore thunder, with sideline and stats, and have loved the game since.

It was about three years ago when my husband, head coach Warren Smart, and I had the conversation about starting the team in Northwest London, we had identified there was a gap for a senior team in the area as the Warriors and Olympians covered the south London area and the Blitz to the north east. We wanted to make it easy for people to take part and try out the sport for the first time, that’s why we provide a loan of equipment to reduce the monetary barriers into American Football.

We also wanted a team that stood for something in the community, which is why we chose the ‘Stallions’. Wembley has a long history with sport and in 1923 the first ever FA cup final was played, with nearly twice as many supporters turning up to the game as expected. A brave white horse, known as Billy, had to control the fans as crowds invaded the pitch, to this day it’s still referred to as the ‘white horse final’ and why he is our mascot and our motto, ‘Respect All, Fear None’ to commemorate Billy’s exemplary work.

Apart from game day management, dealing with the governing body BAFA and recruitment of players I also apply for grants to help support the club with equipment and start up of other teams within the club. We are extremely grateful to Wembley National Stadium Trust for our very first grant which really kickstarted the club and enabled us to buy 10 helmets and 10 shoulder pads. So far we have probably introduced over 200 people to the sport, including our under 17s, under 19s and Women’s Team.

The dream is for all areas of the club to be successful, our senior team currently at 7-0 have their eyes on the prize, while the under 17s are playing in their first year of tournaments. Our women’s team had a fantastic first season coming runner up in the Southern conference of the Sapphire Series in their debut year. To achieve this we need volunteers and helpers from all areas, parents, partners and football fans who want to be a bit closer to the sport. The hardest thing for me is actually watching a game as there is so much to do, but I love looking after the Team and really feel like I am part of a great family with focused goals, determined spirit, and inspirational passion.

So if you want to be a part of the team, try the pads on for size or be a super fan please get in contact with teammanager@wembleystallions.com or via our Facebook page

Thinking of trying a new sport? Grace Hilbourne tells us about her experiences joining the Wembley Stallions Women’s team

It’s daunting to join a new team. Regardless of how old you are, how much experience you have or how ‘fit’ you consider yourself to be, joining a new team will always have some measure of nerves and hesitation attached to it. That’s exactly how I felt a few months ago when I first approached Team Manager Jackie Houtris and asked whether the women’s team was taking on any new players. I had text her in the late afternoon and by that evening I had been added to the team group chat and already exchanged hellos with most of the coaches and players.

It was this inclusiveness and camaraderie that really drew me to the Wembley Stallions. Gone were awkward introductions and exchanges of names that you are bound to forget when meeting someone face to face for the first time. Instead, I got to speak to the other players and coaches for a few days before I finally did meet them. When I walked in to the changing rooms for the first time, it already felt like I was joining in with a group of people that I knew and had chatted with.

They couldn’t have been more helpful either. I was nervous about starting a new sport. I had never even picked up a football that wasn’t round and had no idea of the rules on field. I had no kit and no clue but was just ready to try something new. Before I’d even asked the question of what I needed to wear or bring for a game, one of the girls messaged me and gave me a full list of everything I’d need to have. Surprisingly it wasn’t that much either. I thought starting American Football was going to cost me a fortune, but I couldn’t have been more wrong. I was simply told to bring a gum shield, a pair of navy socks and some boots. The rest could be sorted out for me while I decided whether I wanted to play long term. Of course, you can buy your own pads and helmet but there are always plenty of both that you can borrow week in and week out which some of the girls on the team do.

The rules as well were something that came slightly easier than expected and that’s all down to the amazing support of the coaches and the ladies of the team. Head Coach Warren Smart is everything you’d want in a teacher and coach. He’s extremely knowledgeable and tremendously hard working. He coaches the men’s, women’s and youth team. Not only does he do this, but he does this equally. You can see it means just as much to him when we win as to when the men’s team or youths win. This is something that can be quite rare in a male dominated sport, so it’s really nice to see and really encouraging as a player. He will beast you at training and then have a laugh with you on the side line when it’s all done. It’s this balance that makes you work hard for him and in return you get taught by one of the best coaches in the league. The support of the assistant coaches and team management also help no end. Every coach can give you tips and techniques that you can actually feel develop you as a player. They’re all always there to answer questions or queries and you feel comfortable asking them which is a really lovely situation to be in when you’re new to the sport.

However, it’s the team mates and friends you’ll make within this group of people that make the Wembley Stallions a really special thing to be part of. We are all completely different. The women’s team is filled with women of different ages, different sizes and different sporting histories. Some girls have played for a while, whilst this season was the first for some others.  I joined nearing the end of the season and the women’s team finished second in the league having ended with 5 wins and 3 losses. Away in Norwich, we won our last game of the season 26 – 2. When the whistle blew I was hugging every member of the team like I’d known them years and singing along on the coach home like I’d been part of everything since day one. It was this experience that showed me how much I wanted to play for the team and what a great group of players and coaches that I had joined.

All in all I’ve had a really great time with the Wembley Stallions so far. The sport as a whole is expanding for women and it’s going to be a really exciting few years to see how it grows and develops. As a new team member and a new player to American Football, I’ve felt included and part of the group since day one and I’d encourage anyone who’s even thinking about joining just to turn up and give it a go. It’s a tough sport, but it’s also one of the most rewarding. Now I’m just very excited now to see how far this team can go.

Grace Hilbourne

Running Back & Corner Back

The Importance of Mindset in Sport: A female perspective

Many women (and men I’m sure) worry about joining a new sport or team for many reasons. They’re worried about not fitting in, ‘not being good’ at their sport, or about other members of their team being significantly better or more experienced than them. Perhaps they aren’t particularly confident as a person, or in their ability to play sport, and it has taken them months to pluck up the courage to go and join a new team. For women, any initial reservations about taking up a new sport are compounded by the fact that most sports are heavily male dominated, which raises a multitude of new concerns. The sport of american football, one of the sports most often perceived as being a ‘man’s world’, is therefore not the obvious choice for many women. The thought of being ignored is one thing, not to mention the fear of being harassed or made the butt of a sexist joke passed off as ‘banter’ or ‘just a bit of fun.’ These scenarios do happen in sport, and it is a shame, because teams are alienating some potentially talented athletes. But women (and men) interested in taking up the sport should take heart- it doesn’t have to play out that way.

I first became involved in american football during my final year at university. Though I was never in a situation in which I played competitively, I enjoyed joining in with kitted practices and drills alongside a small group of other like-minded women. It wasn’t until joining the Wembley Stallions that I was able to pursue contact football seriously. I can say with total honesty that I experienced none of the unfriendliness, cliques, or unfriendly behaviour I mentioned above. More importantly, the expectation from the beginning is that I would participate in all the same drills and activities as the senior men’s team. As more women joined the team, this attitude did not change. Our head coach reiterates to every new player who joins that they will be treated in exactly the same way as the male members of the organisation- discrimination, sexism, whatever you want to call it, just doesn’t figure at all. If you’re turning up to training, you’re getting stuck in with whatever everyone else is doing, regardless of gender.

Now I should preface the remainder of this article by saying that I wholly accept that there are physical, biological differences that separate men and women. Men are, typically, stronger and faster purely by virtue of being men. That’s the way it is. But in a sport like american football, there is a great deal to be said about the importance of mindset and mental state in relation to success.

In a conversation with my head coach recently, we spoke about this very issue, agreeing that there are plenty of players who join the sport without accepting just how physical it can be, which can cause all sorts of problems for them. We talk about making a ‘commitment’ to the tackle or block, or about taking ‘big hits’ during play, all of which involve considerable amounts of physical contact (we don’t wear helmets for nothing!) A player who doesn’t yet have the toughness and strong mindset will, unfortunately, struggle with this sport, both in terms of being successful and also staying healthy and injury free. I have had the chance to meet and speak with players from multiple football teams, some of which are good friends of mine. They can all tell me of situations when either they or one of their team mates has expressed a degree of uncertainty, fear, or apprehension about playing such a physical sport. In fact, I would say that anybody who says they have never felt that way, even if just for the first snap of their first ever game, is probably not being totally truthful. And there’s nothing at all wrong with feeling that way to begin with. It goes completely against the human survival instinct to put yourself in a position where you could get hurt. The key is to develop yourself mentally and physically in such a way that means fear is no longer a factor. Often, this happens naturally through experience of playing the game and getting used to the physicality of the sport- how long it takes depends on the person and the people around them.

But how does this relate to women? Am I suggesting that women lack this crucial mental skill that players need to succeed? Absolutely not. In fact, quite the opposite. Coach Smart has mentioned on multiple occasions how impressed he has been with the way female players (most of whom have joined the Stallions as total rookies) have immersed themselves in learning proper tackling technique, showing little to no ‘fear’ or nervousness. Indeed, both Coach Smart and other coaches of our team have commented that some of the women demonstrated a mental strength and toughness that some of the seniors could learn from.

The fact is, there a many factors that influence and contribute to success in sport, for both men and women. Diet, exercise, training are all key, of course. Some coaches talk about seeing ‘natural ability’ on the field, or having ‘born athletes’ on their team. This may also be true. But anyone who has played american football will always tell you how important your mentality and mindset are, both on and off the field. How well you deal with setbacks, how you process them, will be reflected in your on-field performance. In our first season in the league we dealt with losing games and players getting injured which, for a team whose players are not all experienced in dealing with those kinds of mental knocks, could have seriously impacted us going forward. But as a team, as a unit, we pulled together, we supported each other and, with the help of our coaches, we turned those knocks into success. We built up resilience with every knock- and we finished our season 5-3, coming second in our division. In our first season. If that doesn’t speak huge volumes to the importance of a positive mental attitude, I don’t know what does.  

 

Claire West

Centre

Captain